Wednesday, 2 May 2012

Good “MARINE BATTERIES” have high cranking amps


Marine batteries are a cross between car batteries and deep cycle

The best marine battery is the one that will suit your needs, in other words how big or small do you need the battery to be to carry out the job that you want it to do. Do you need a small 65 amp battery or a large 110 amp battery?.
You also need to know about the reserve capacity rating (this is how long you can use and drain the battery). The higher reserve capacity the better.. You also will want to look at the MCCA rating which stands for Marine cold cranking amp rating. The higher is better. Also the higher the marine cranking amp rating the better.
You also will need to know about the reserve capacity rating (this is the length of time you can use and drain the battery). The higher your reserve capacity the better.. You also will want to look at the MCCA rating of the batteries, which stands for “cold cranking amp rating”. Higher the better. Also the higher the marine cranking amp rating the better. Another important fact is the pulse cranking amp rating which measures the starting amperage of the engine
Marine batteries are a sort of cross between car batteries with their high cranking amps (short bursts of high power to start a car) and deep cycle batteries used on golfing trolleys and other devices designed for continuous use. Marine batteries have high cranking amps (which the boating industry calls marine cranking amp's) to start the engine but they also have to run the electrics for several hours like a deep cycle battery does.
There are three different types of batteries that you need to consider before buying a new battery. First is the standard car type lead acid batteries(also called flooded), AGM,(absorbed glass matting) and gel cell (silica added to the acid to produce a gel type substance in the battery casing). These batteries are recharged at a very slow rate. AGM batteries recharge quickly the same as a car type battery, they are sealed and don’t leak , ideal for boats that sail in sea, as battery acid and salt water produce a poisonous gas and should not be mixed. Most marine batteries will be sealed and maintenance-free.
You also need to know about the reserve capacity rating (this is how long you can use and drain the battery). The higher reserve capacity the better.. You also will want to look at the MCCA rating which stands for cold cranking amp rating. Higher is better. Also the higher the marine cranking amp rating the better. Another vital statistic is the pulse cranking amp rating which measures the starting amperage of the engine
“Deep cycle marine batteries” are the batteries that are designed for continuous use for long periods of time. But they still have to have enough cranking amperage to get the motor started. AGM batteries are the ones that you require for long long sailings, some boats have say 6 x 150 amp AGM batteries to run them. Believe me these are not cheap batteries.

. When you look at the price of marine batteries you will see a wide range of choice,



from £90 to well over £150 each per battery. There are several online companies, that will help you figure out the batteries you may need. In my opinion you should replace the batteries that you have had on before with the same batteries.